Category: Link

Susan J. Robertson on “Aging Out” of Tech

I’ve been thinking about tech and aging lately. It feels so much like a young person’s place to be, with the emphasis on spending all of your time learning and working, be it paid work or side projects. I’ve been the oldest person, or one of the oldest, at most places I’ve worked the past few years. And recently a friend talked about aging out, specifically in regards to being a woman in tech, making plans for what to do next since she knows so few older women in tech. It got me thinking, a lot. I realized that I hardly know any women over 45 who are still working in tech. It’s less than the fingers on one hand.

Susan writes about her particular experience of being a woman in tech, but over the break I found myself thinking about many of the same things. I quite enjoy learning new skills, but I also find myself rejecting the implicit assumption that by participating in tech culture I must devote all my free time to learning and staying on the cutting edge.

I feel that tension more often these days as I move deeper into a role that is weighted heavily towards management (as opposed to writing code). I worry that the further I get from day-to-day coding, the less portable I become in the tech economy. I also wonder how much tolerance I have left for an industry that overwhelmingly values novelty and aesthetics over accessibility and usefulness.

Jorge Arango on Design Artifacts

Loved this graf:

It’s easy for us to fall into the trap of believing that artifacts are the design. I’ve seen situations where stakeholders specify upfront the types and quantity of “deliverables” for a design project, with no regard for what they will be used for. Designers willingly comply because they, too, tend to measure their progress based on the wireframes, sketches, prototypes or whatever else they’ve produced. This is a mistake. Artifacts are communication tools. They’re a sort of language we employ when communicating intent; a means to create ​a feedback loop between the design team and others in the world — which is to say, a means for bringing others into the design team. Using the wrong feedback loop with the wrong audience at the wrong time can do more harm than good.

(Via Kevin Hoffman.)

Post to Instagram from the Web

I’ve been wanting this for a while—I like browsing Instagram via the web on my laptop, simply because the images are bigger (I have an iPhone 5, and Instagram doesn’t have an official iPad app).

I had to change my user agent to be Safari on iOS, but once I did that I got the “+” button to start the upload process.

Joshua Ginter on Developing a Journaling Habit

One of those necessities: altering — or perhaps recognizing — the real definition of “journaling”. Many people associate “journaling” with penning complete thoughts into a pen-and-paper diary. However, “journaling” is really just a synonym for “recording”. You can record thoughts, sure, but you can also record a daily log of events, or fitness regiments, or what you ate for breakfast.

I like a lot of what Joshua shared in terms of his journaling mindset/process. Like Joshua, I have a daily journal that I keep in Day One. I found that setting a schedule helped build momentum early on (I have a reminder set for 10:30 pm, but these days I’ve usually written something before that goes off). Another thing that was helpful was setting no limit on subject or length: an entry could be about anything, and as little as one word.

RIP Popular Photography

DPReview:

The upcoming March/April issue will be the last, and as of Friday, March 10th, no new content will be published on PopPhoto.com. This news comes after the publication switched to a bi-monthly print schedule about six months ago. 

Sad (if unsurprising) news—I still read Popular Photography regularly via my local library’s digital magazine bookshelf. Photo (and photo gear) blogs may have eaten up a lot of the attention and readership that Popular Photography used to command, but I still appreciated the way a coherent editorial vision could be expressed through a monthly (and later, bi-monthly) issue.

RIP TextWrangler

Bare Bones, on TextWrangler’s future:

What you may not know is that last July, we released BBEdit 11.6. You can use this version unlicensed, forever, for free. Without a license, BBEdit now includes all of the features that TextWrangler offers, plus quite a few others. That’s right. You no longer have to pick between them.
If this sounds like TextWrangler will eventually be sunsetted, you’re right; it will.

FWIW TextWrangler was always my go-to text editor if I had to do a simple find-and-replace in a massive text file (like a SQL dump). Where Sublime and TextMate would choke and beachball, TextWrangler always came through. Good to see that an unlicensed BBEdit version carries the torch.

(Via 9to5Mac.)